Colonial goods shop

Colonial goods shop in the "Stübchen"
Colonial goods shop in the "Stübchen"

[Rhineland, around 1893/94] When Count Andras’ and Sophie left, the Count’s loyal batman Jacob had remained with Sophie’s aging parents Anni and Jean, and the three of them had hit it off right away. Jacob had long since become a family member, and was running the “Stübchen”.

Now the “Stübchen” becomes a colonial good shop. In the guestroom room, Jacob offered hot chocolate and coffee. The guests could have a seat and read the newspapers he offered and write. Sometimes children would come after school and make their homework, often enough with his help. In the working room on the left, where once Grandma Limbach had made and presented her creations, was now his colonial goods shop. It was a homey shop, lovingly decorated. On the shelves stood Jacob’s merchandise – cocoa from Africa, coffee from Central America, chocolate and cane sugar from the Caribbean, tobacco, and tropical fruits. It was not a particularly profitable business, since he often gave free chocolate to the children of the neighborhood, but he did not have to fear for his home, and Count Csabany had given his faithful servant a more than generous sum as starting capital.

Renowned companies advertised their cocoa beans to come from German colonies only. When Jacob bought goods, he made sure that his trading partners were honorable merchants. One of these distant places he would love to see – Tendaguru in East Africa, where one wanted to dig up the big animals that were so much talked about – dinosaurs.
Often Jacob’s thoughts wandered into these distant lands. Togo, Cameroon, Southwest and East Africa, Kaiser Wilhelm Land on New Guinea, the Bismarck Archipelago and the Marshall Islands. What were they like? Did the great powers really have a right at all to divide the world among them? Many whites considered themselves far superior to all others, and even thought it was scientifically proven. This led to a sense of mission to bring one’s own civilization to the rest of the world.

Jacob’s interest in nature was accompanied by a deep love for her. Believing as he was, he could not imagine that God had deliberately brought higher and inferior creatures into the world.

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